Flats or Heels? The Eternal Question
Susan Hoff
May 8, 2020

Is one better for sculpting shapely legs or just for ceasing foot cramps?

You will not believe this. I settled down to my computer with the intent of digging into the flats versus heels argument. I thought I had a decent idea of what I would find. After all, most of us have achy feet after a day of wearing heels. What I found really surprised me though. Podiatrists (foot doctors) don't recommend most heels OR flats these days. So, let that sink in, and when you're ready, move on to the next paragraphs about what makes heels (and flats) bad for us.

What’s So Bad about Heels?

Heels offer a visible "lift" to the glutes, and make us hold that shapely look in our thighs and calves. I can't deny they are often uncomfortable, but who doesn't like a nice "lift?" However, scientists say heels can weaken the calf muscles and shorten them by 13% on average in two years. This means that when you switch to tennis shoes, you can actually feel pain because your calves are not used to being extended. The study that measured calf length and strength over two years targeted women who wore heels several hours per day, so occasional heel wearing isn't reported to cause this change.

…Then What’s So Terrible about Flats?

So, if heels shorten calf muscles, flats do... what? It's what they don't do that causes problems actually. Flats are notorious for not having any arch support and being very thin. Your heel striking the ground with little cushion causes problems in all of the joints in your legs. Lack of arch support encourages the development of plantar fasciitis, which is inflammation in the tissue that connect the heel to the toes. Ouch!

This news had me looking closely at all of my favorite shoes. If you love your stilettos like I do, try slipping them off at your desk and doing some stretches every few hours. If you can't live without your flats, invest in some new ones that offer a small heel and arch support. The foot doctors say that besides properly fitted tennis shoes, shoes with a chunky heel of 1-2 inches offer the most stability and support. With that in mind, check out my Poshmark closet to see the sexy sassy heels I am selling.

References:

Source for the study: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-1295169/How-swapping-heels-flats-work-seriously-damage-calves.htmlFlats 

More on how bad heels are: http://www.huffingtonpost.com.au/2016/08/17/this-is-what-wearing-heels-all-day-does-to-your-body_a_21453115/

Ratings for all types of shoes: https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/hands-down-these-are-the-worst-shoes-for-your-feet_us_581bad9ee4b01022624114ba

Best shoes: https://www.piedmont.org/living-better/the-best-and-worst-shoes-for-your-feet




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Flats or Heels? The Eternal Question

Read Story
Susan Hoff
Read Story

You will not believe this. I settled down to my computer with the intent of digging into the flats versus heels argument. I thought I had a decent idea of what I would find. After all, most of us have achy feet after a day of wearing heels. What I found really surprised me though. Podiatrists (foot doctors) don't recommend most heels OR flats these days. So, let that sink in, and when you're ready, move on to the next paragraphs about what makes heels (and flats) bad for us.

What’s So Bad about Heels?

Heels offer a visible "lift" to the glutes, and make us hold that shapely look in our thighs and calves. I can't deny they are often uncomfortable, but who doesn't like a nice "lift?" However, scientists say heels can weaken the calf muscles and shorten them by 13% on average in two years. This means that when you switch to tennis shoes, you can actually feel pain because your calves are not used to being extended. The study that measured calf length and strength over two years targeted women who wore heels several hours per day, so occasional heel wearing isn't reported to cause this change.

…Then What’s So Terrible about Flats?

So, if heels shorten calf muscles, flats do... what? It's what they don't do that causes problems actually. Flats are notorious for not having any arch support and being very thin. Your heel striking the ground with little cushion causes problems in all of the joints in your legs. Lack of arch support encourages the development of plantar fasciitis, which is inflammation in the tissue that connect the heel to the toes. Ouch!

This news had me looking closely at all of my favorite shoes. If you love your stilettos like I do, try slipping them off at your desk and doing some stretches every few hours. If you can't live without your flats, invest in some new ones that offer a small heel and arch support. The foot doctors say that besides properly fitted tennis shoes, shoes with a chunky heel of 1-2 inches offer the most stability and support. With that in mind, check out my Poshmark closet to see the sexy sassy heels I am selling.

References:

Source for the study: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-1295169/How-swapping-heels-flats-work-seriously-damage-calves.htmlFlats 

More on how bad heels are: http://www.huffingtonpost.com.au/2016/08/17/this-is-what-wearing-heels-all-day-does-to-your-body_a_21453115/

Ratings for all types of shoes: https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/hands-down-these-are-the-worst-shoes-for-your-feet_us_581bad9ee4b01022624114ba

Best shoes: https://www.piedmont.org/living-better/the-best-and-worst-shoes-for-your-feet




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